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Living with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)

How do you get through your school day? College or High school, anything works


#1

Looking for help from people around my age. I am 15 and in high school and have tried a few ideas on how to get through my rough school days, but I am still in pain most of the day. If you have any ideas please feel free to share your story and how you have tackled your school days with this crazy thing called PsA.

-Morgan,15


#2

Lighten up! Literally…I used a rolling bag when I was taking classes. Some schools don’t allow them, but you can probably get an exception.

Get a note that excuses you from class and an rx from your doc for your favorite NSAID, and keep it in the nurses office. When you feel especially cruddy, you can go take a pill and rest until it kicks in. Make sure that you either have a small recorder in class to record the lecture or someone who is really good at note taking that can copy their notes for you.

Try to get good sleep every night. Even if you aren’t necessarily tired, get to bed at a regular time. Follow a regular sleep routine every night.

Try not to let things pile up. Keep an agenda with your assignment, exams written down so that you don’t forget things In Your brain fog moments. Keep up with things, because if you let them pile up, you will never be able to catch up without killing yourself.

That’s all I’ve got!


#3

I’ve done the litghting up… Majorly! I have no book ag anymore and keep things in my teachers classrooms except for homework obviously and my pencil and things. I just got back on prednisone, do I take that to school or…?


#4

My son had an agreed ‘time out card’ with his school. He suffered from ADD and Severs Disease (painful inflammation of the heels) This meant he could just quietly ask for time out if he was beginning to ‘zone out’ with his ADD or go to the office for his med with out having to explain over and over about his conditions, which he found difficult. He had a Dictaphone that his friend would record his homework on if he was out of the room at the time it was given. He was also assigned an older helper,one of the kids who was on the student council, to assist with problems a find away forward that worked for everyone.


#5

To take meds to school, most schools require a form be completed by the prescribing doc. You might be able to find this on the schools website. Once the doc signs off on it a parent will need to take the form and the meds in their original bottle to the school. Then, when you need to take the med, just go to the nurse’s office. If you decide to do this, go ahead and take the pills that you plan to take at home it of the bottle and leave them there. Then, one of your parents won’t have to got to the School before and after to drop off or pick up your meds. I hope that all makes sense!


#6

Also, if you have hand and wrist issues, writing can really hurt. I got a small recorder and used it to record all of my lectures. Then I could listen to them over again when I needed to.


#7

Ask your teachers about sitting at the back or side of the so you can get up and stretch or even just move around without distracting other students if you need to :)


#8

Hello, I know your pain! I am 20 and in college fighting this nasty thing too! Most colleges have programs where you can get assigned note takers so I go pick them up once a week to study. I try to give myself extra time to do assignments because I have a lot of trouble writing. Yoga can really help too with the stress! Don't get discouraged if anyone comments negatively about any braces you may wear because trust me I know all about that! Most teens can't relate to something like this so I just try to find some humor to lighten the mood when it gets brought up. I always call myself an old lady just because I have to find something to laugh about. Talk to your teachers about getting up to stretch or possible deadlines. Some may give you outlined notes or powerpoints. Good Luck!


#9

I see this discussion hasn't had active comments in a while, but this is something I like to talk about.

I was diagnosed with PsA just after turning 23 years old and starting graduate school. I am now 24 and finished my first 1.5 years of grad school. I use enbrel and methotrexate, and sometimes walk with a cane.

Things you can do on your own to make life easier:

1) Take the elevator sometimes.

2) If you must write, get fat pens with grips. You can find them at any office supply store and they make writing so much easier!

3) Ask for help! Sometimes the littlest things are the most frustrating, such as opening a candy bar, picking something up off the ground, or reaching for an object up high. At school and at work, I casually ask for help all the time. People will help without even thinking about it, even at the grocery store. Ex: "Hey can you open this?" "Sure." End of conversation.

4) Be kind to yourself and others. Rest, and help others around you understand you need rest sometimes. Many people have never heard of PsA or are unaware that this is different than your grandma's arthritis. If a sibling, parent, teacher, friend, employer doesn't understand, teach them. Avoid self-pity or making them feel bad; help them understand PsA, and understand that you might not be up to your usual activity level sometimes. Tell them to google it or go to the National Psoriasis Foundation. I never had an issue here with friends or teachers, but I still have to remind my mom sometimes that I can't always have a full-activity day with hours of walking or being outside like I used to. And that is okay.

5) Continue learning. Understand PsA through and through the best you can by asking your rheumatologist and/or physical therapist questions, read about treatments or strategies online, keep track of your own progress and health, and stay on top of your medicine and exercises (whatever they may be for you!).

These tips are applicable at any age/stage in life, but are things I wish I had someone close to my age to tell me. You can and will get through school! Promise!