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Living with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)

Is this true?


#1

My rhuematologist insist I also have fibromyalgia. I have none of the symptoms except fatigue. He said I would never qualify for disability because of the fibromyalgia . He also said the long bones in my fingers are very thinned. He said I had no cartilage in my hands and wrist. I work full time as the director of a rehab and the only speech language pathologist. I am in horrible pain. No pain meds. He says because of the government. Using my hands is horrible. My feet are just as bad. The rest of my joints are manageable. He said I would be in horrible pain with no financial support from disability if I quit working. Is this true? If so, do you have any tips for coping? I’m desperate. I should not be working with this pain. My quality of life is horrible! I have had PSA for about 25 years.


#2

I can’t imagine that’s true… please find another doctor! There’s people from the USA here who can probably help you better… Hug!


#3

Any ideas of who can help?


#4

This makes no sense to me. Let me start with the fibromyalgia question. I clearly can’t diagnose you. But fatigue can be a major issue with PsA. Yes, it can also be an issue for people with fibromyalgia, but fatigue does not automatically equal fibromyalgia. That’s just weird.

In terms of the disability question, there’s a few different ways to approach this. But there are disability lawyers you can work with. There are also social workers in this field, etc. If it’s feasible, I would also get a second opinion/new doctor.


#6

It’s hard to find a rheumatologist. I live in a very small town. My first one was 1.5 hours away. This one is just a little farther away. I don’t care about the drive. I’ll go wherever I have to for good care.


#7

Please seek another opinion. There are ring splints that can be made to support your fingers, and also wrist splints that may help you function better. (people with Ehlers Danlos often wear silver ring splints that keep their hands/finger joints from dislocating or subluxing).
Don’t give up. Find another doctor ASAP.


#8

I will try to find one!


#9

A lot of what qualifies someone for disability is based on age. If you are younger, you won’t as they expect you to go to Vocational Rehabilitation and get retrained. However, since you have both PsA and fibromyalgia, and you have suffered for 25+ yrs, you have a chance. You should be able to take some sort of pain medicine, even if it’s 25 mg of Tramadol in the morning and evening, UNLESS, you have a history of drug addiction, then Dr.'s aren’t willing to prescribe pain medicines. Your PCP can prescribe them if your rheumatologist won’t. Hope that helps. Brenda
P.S. remember, even if you do go out on disability, you have to be disabled (not working) for six months before you qualify.


#10

I have no drug abuse history. I’m 53. I’m not intending to go on disability anytime soon. I don’t want to stop working. My doctor just scared me for my future if it gets to where I can’t work. Also I’m very, very tired of being in pain.


#11

Krisi, your profile isn’t showing what treatment you’re on because when we moved from our old platform, that data couldn’t be imported. What’s your treatment plan? How is your rheumatologist working to minimize your damage going forward?

Makes no sense to me either: you really need a second opinion. Really.


#12

Humeria and methotrexate.


#13

Well that, at least, is good. (I’m on that combo as well!)

Seenie


#14

Hi there Krisi, I have no idea how things are done where you are as far as disability or insurance etc are concerned, however, I would suspect that perhaps fibromyalgia on it’s own may not allow qualification for disability, however the PsA probably would, should you get to the point where you are unable to work any longer and there is evidence of unrepairable joint damage from it… perhaps you could find online somewhere a list of things that could qualify, just to put your mind at rest. Or maybe ask your GP when you next see them for something.


#15

I will ask. You know an unknown future is scary!


#16

Yes, it’s the gold standard for what I hear.


#17

Yes, usually things don’t turn out as bad as our fears seem to get when they are left to run rampant through our thoughts… it can be very hard not to worry though, so always best to check these out so you know where you stand, should you ever need that info. Here’s hoping it won’t be an issue for you for many years yet!! :slight_smile:


#18

I hope so! Thank you!


#19

The fear and terror of what the future might hold can fell all of us. I have learnt this past two years that what I fear is my new reality isn’t right. It is frankly a lot better (mostly) than I feared. But this disease makes us clutch at the fear too, lots. I’ve found it hard too much of the time to resist that ‘clutching’ sometimes. But when I do manage it, (not as often as I’d like to, either) it truly is OK. Sometimes it’s actually OK to acknowledge today isn’t as bad as I thought it might be. And just rest with that. For now.


#20

Hey, I am sure about disability but multiple diagnoses might qualify you. My Rheume says i have both fibro and Psa. I still experience chronic pain, daily unrelenting. Seek Another doc.,get a second opinion. Your doc will need to refer you to a pain clinic. Second, try Naproxen along with prescription. Try to move even when you do not feel like it.


#21

I can’t take Naproxen. I do keep moving and work fill time.